Category Archives: Woodworking

Project Update

So it’s been almost a month since I’ve posted anything. There’s a great reason for that. I’ve been spending crazy amounts of time getting a new kitchen cabinet set complete prior to my kitchen renovation. After all, why buy inferior cabinets or over priced high quality ones when you can make them yourself right?

That said so far I’ve ended up with nearly 200 raw videos of making this entire set, which to meet the deadlines I have, leaves very little time for editing all those videos into my Kitchen Cabinet Series.

Once I get everything complete I should have more time to edit the videos and get some video content posted.

In the meantime however here are some progress pictures.

First there was one cabinet, then two, then three … you get the picture.

SBW#15 – Dresser Drawer Repair

Do you have a dresser drawer that has a bottom that has sagged down? I had this happen to me with both my daughter and son’s dressers. As it turns out the fix for both of them is really simple, it just required a little time for some glue up.

So, first things first – you need to unload the contents of the dresser drawer and pull the drawer out. In my case to remove the drawer was as easy as fully extending it and giving it a slight lift up at the drawer front while pulling out. This allowed the slides to separate and the drawer to be removed.

Once I had the drawer removed I just had to separate the back of the drawer box from the rest. This allowed the drawer bottom to slide out. My solution was to put a small strip of wood underneath the front of the drawer bottom panel. In order to glue it up I needed to remove any finish and stain that was on the backside of the drawer front. If you skip this part chances are the glue to hold the strip of wood on will not adhere. I used Titebond Wood Glue to glue the small strip I cut, clamping to keep some pressure on it.

Once the strip was glued in, I added glue to the groove the drawer bottom slid into and slid the drawer bottom back in. I then screwed the drawer box back panel back on. I continued by wiping up any glue squeeze out and let the glue set up over night.

Then it was just putting the drawer back in the dresser and putting the contents back in.

In this video I show what I did to fix the drawer. I hope you find this video helpful.

Pause in Updates

First let me say it has been a while since I have made an update. This is partly in fact because I have several on-going projects that I am working on along with busy spring / summer activities. Several are complete but I have not had time to edit the raw videos into a nice presentation and the others are ongoing still.

So – what is done but not edited yet?

I painted the walls and refinished the floors in our spare bedroom. This is where we planned on moving our daughter into from her smaller child room. Here is just one of the pictures of the floor. After she was moved into this room I got a chance to do the same (paint and refinish) to her old room.

My son’s dresser drawer bottoms were falling out on 2 of his drawers so I need to fix them. Who hasn’t purchased clothes furniture that has 1/8″ thick drawer bottoms and not had issues like this?

I built a longer sacrificial fence for my table saw. This will be used for a project that I’m currently working on – Complete Kitchen Cabinet Replacement. You can even notice some of the rough Maple lumber to the upper left for that project.

So what is in progress?

Here are 5 of the 14 face frames I need to make for our new kitchen cabinets. The frames will be maple painted white with Maple veneered plywood for the cabinet boxes with a clear finish – at least that’s the plan.

SBW#7 – Central Machinery Belt Sander Assembly and Review

Some time ago I purchased a Central Machinery 4″ x 36″ Belt and 6″ Disk Sander. For the longest time I had just clamped by 3″ wide portable belt sander upside down and used it like a stationary one but I found that as I used it with more projects I need a wider/longer table to do quality work.

As a result, I foray in this realm is with a bench top model from Harbor Freight. While I know most of the time their tools will not pass the longevity test, it made a good starter.

I unboxed it and started to assembly this unit and could already tell that would be the case.

One of the things I took notice of was the dust collection system on this device was not very robust. In fact, I am not sure how it even manages to work with a 1/2″ dust port on the disk sander dust guard definitely limits the cfm that you need to move dust. The port under the belt was better but certainly not what I was expecting. Perhaps this was designed to be hooked up to a small shopvac? I am not sure but my 4″ system could easily swallow the dust guards themselves.

The other thing that bothered me was the bed for the belt had a twist in it. It is one thing for the bed to be not square but with a twist in it, well, that will not necessarily make straight edges. I do believe though I can twist it back in shape but still I should not have to do that for a new piece of equipment.

Using the sander though was much nicer than my old setup. Even with the same grit sandpaper it seemed to easily take on the jobs I threw at it. Perhaps that is because the motor was just better than a portable one and therefore did not bog down as much. Plus, it comes with the added bonus of having lower decibels than my old portable Skill Belt Sander.

Overall, assembly was smooth minus some force needed to get the rubber feet on, overall stability is not great but good considering the price point. Longevity has yet to be determined. The two major downsides that I have found was the twist in the bed and dust collection – who needs one for a high dust creating device right?

Below is the video of the assembly. If you enjoy it, please give a thumbs up and do not forget to subscribe.

 

SBW#1 & 2 – Crosscut Sled Part 1 & 2

SBW or Sean’s Basement Workshop is where I make and/or repair things.

This post is the first of hopefully many more to come where I show how-to guides and videos as well as other items that I have done in or around my home. Some may be in my basement workshop while others are not.

This article is about a Crosscut Sled I made for my table saw.  For years I have just used my table saw for ripping or cross cutting larger pieces of materials. But as time has continued the need to better stabilize any material I was cross cutting has become evident. No longer was my table saw factory’s miter gauge able to do this so I decided to build a medium – or at least that is what I like to size it as – Crosscut Sled.

This is a two part series because my camera died about half way through filming this and the second camera I used had a different resolution. So, in order to make the videos consistent there is a part 1 and part 2.

Here is what the finished product looks like.

From the back…20160103_142811-thumb

From the front…20160103_142827-thumb

Part 1 of the series can be found on my YouTube Channel with this link or you can watch the embedded video below.

Crosscut Sled Video Part 1

Part 2 of the series can be found on my YouTube Channel with this link or you can watch the embedded video below.

Crosscut Sled Video Part 2