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SBW#29 – Table saw tilt adjustment wheel repair

You’re using one of the adjustment wheels on your table saw, whether it is to adjust the height or angle of your blade, and all of sudden you hear plastic crunching from the wheel. What do you do? Well, my first thought was I turned the wheel too far and something broke.

Sure enough the nut that is permanently affixed to the center of the blade tilt adjustment wheel broke free of the handle tearing bits of plastic out with it.

Do I buy a replacement adjustment wheel? Well, if you have been keeping up with me the answer should be apparent – No. Plus it doesn’t help you cannot actually buy the replacement part but there is an aftermarket Handwheel Handle Crank replacement but this way is faster. I could also spend the time building a brand new one out of laminated plywood but that too would take too much time. So, lets fix it.

The first thing I need to do is take the existing adjustment wheel off the table saw. To do this there is a small allen screw that holds the wheel and nut to the table saw. Unscrew it carefully with an Allen wrench as to not drop the allen screw, washer or nut that is inside the wheel.

Next I’ll need to break out any broken pieces of plastic from the center hub of the wheel were the nut was attached and scuff up the plastic where I will epoxy the nut back in. Follow up this by a good cleaning. I just used denatured alcohol because it dries quickly and without leaving any residue.

Once that has been cleaned up I set up a little area the adjustment wheel would sit level so that when I poured the epoxy in it would level out and not run off or out one side. I mixed up a entire syringe of J-B Weld 50133 Plastic Bonder in a paper Dixie cup. This allowed me to, what I thought would be, squeeze it out. However it turns out it didn’t want to squeeze out so I just used the mixing stick that came with the J-B Weld to scoop it out and into the area I needed.

I was sure to put some on the nut bottom as well as the sides of the nut where the plastic was not broken so when I pushed the nut back in the adjustment wheel hub there was good bonding there.

I proceeded to ladle out the remaining epoxy around the nut until the hub was full. Rather than use a each source which I though might melt some of the adjustment wheel plastic I just used an old pair of Craftsman needle nose pliers to pop any bubbles.

Once the epoxy set up for about 2 hours I came back and sanded the surface down with my Central Machinery Belt Sander. This Sander actually has came in relatively handle for it inexpensive cost albeit you cannot push too hard due to the low horsepower motor. Once the epoxy was sanded flat with the wheel I went around with a piece of sandpaper to knock down any sharp edges and do any fine sanding.

When sanding down the epoxy or anything else that creates small dust particles, it is important for your health to use dust protection. I use a this Eclipse S/M Half Mask Respirator. It works great for my size face.

With the newly fixed adjustment wheel complete I proceeded to reattach the wheel back on the table saw by lining up the flat spot on the inside of the nut with the flat spot on the adjustment rod. I slid it on followed by the washer and finally the allen screw. I tightened it up with an Allen wrench moderately making sure not to over tighten it and gave a turn.

Success!

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials

I hope you find this video useful and can use some of the tips presented.

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

Related Articles and Videos

SBW#21 – TABLE SAW PULLEY AND BELT UPGRADE

SBW#28 – Kitchen Cabinets Build Part 5 – Lazy Susan / Corner Base Cabinet Face Frame Assembly

Lazy Susan or also called a Corner Cabinet – How do you assemble the face frame given the fact the frame goes in two different directions? Well, that is exactly what I did here. It’s been many years since I had to build one but we wanted to make the best use of the corner and not have any hidden or access from the from another cabinet crawl space so we elected one of these.

So back when I used to make cabinets in a shop a Lazy Susan cabinet wasn’t an uncommon way to handle this situation so I thought why not have one. However, the one problem my wife and I faced was neither one of really like the Lazy Susan turn tables and they were so inefficient when it comes to space utilization. My solution of course was to turn to the Internet and find a cabinet style that we could agree on and then design it out and assemble it.

Well, as it turns out a corner cabinet with stacked shelving worked great. This style of cabinet is a very basic corner cabinet but has shelving in it that would allow the shelves to be adjustable but never at the same height on both sides because of the way they meet in the center. I’ll show and discuss more of that in the article I actually build the cabinet box for. This article though will only focus on the face frame.

So the face frame is essentially two small rectangle face frames put together at 90 degrees at one end. Then remove the two center stiles. That’s easier said then done because you’re assembling a single frame in 3 dimensional space as opposed to the standard 2 dimensional space you do with normal frames.

However, with pocket screws, clamps and squares you can make it happen. Once you have the C looking frames, imagine a pair of square Cs, assembled you need to make sure the fame is not only square in one way but also square in that “outward” 3rd dimension. Did I mention clamps? Clamps and temporary space boards help wonders.

As always, I try to layout the closely cut lumber so I can get precise measurements. My video below shows laying this 3D frame as best as possible and how I assembled it.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials

I hope you find this video useful and can use some of the tips presented.

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.


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SBW#27 – Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 4

This is the fourth part of my kitchen cabinet build, primarily focusing on the work I did building the base cabinets from start to finish. In this episode I finish assembling the base cabinet face frames. If you want to see how I made the upper cabinets you can read about there here.

Since my shop is rather small and by that I mean like 1/4 of my basement I cannot store nor mill all the lumber I need in a single batch. Therefore I purchased additional Maple and let it acclimate to my basement for 2 to 4 week prior to milling it. I do this process though the entire cabinet build series with one exception – the sheet goods or plywood. Due to the amount needed I purchases and had the entire load delivered. This however was stored in the finished area of my basement.

All the plywood necessary for my project

So after milling and ripping to width additional face frame material I begin basically the same process I did for the upper face frames. However, this time around the styles were only 30 inches long and there would be drawers.

Unlike the upper cabinets I did not need additional width for the bottom rail to conceal the under cabinet lighting so all frame material is 1 1/2 inches in width. This made it much easier for cutting the raw stock in that I didn’t need to make sure I could get the additional 1/4 inch width on the bottom rails.

Again I used the same joinery method for the frames – pocket holes using my Kreg Jig. My model is a K4 and most of my clamps are the older style that do not automatically adjust for thickness but the do the job. It’s important to keep a clean work area when drilling all these pocket holes because you can really end up with a large pile of drill shavings. This is why I use some hose adapters to fit the system onto a 2 1/2 inch dust collector line. You could also use these same fittings to go to a shop vac.

I mentioned earlier that my stiles were 30 inches long. How did I come up with this measurement? Well, typical base cabinet height is 36 inches including the counter top. Knowing my counter top would be 1 1/2 inches (pretty standard) that would give me 34 1/2 inches from the top of the cabinet (excluding the counter top) to the floor. Since I wanted a 4 1/2 inch toe kick at the bottom I ended up with 30 inches (total height – counter top thickness – toe kick = style height or 36″ – 1.5″ – 4.5″ = 30″).

When adding my drawer rail I used a 5 inch space block. This allowed me to keep consistent sizes for all my drawers. This took out any error that might come from using a rule or tape measure to space this rail. All I had to do is stick the spacer block in there and screw the rail in place.

Unlike store bought cabinets my sink cabinet was going to be a custom job also. What do I mean by that? Well, most cabinets come in sizes with multiples of 3 inches – 30, 33, 36, 39, 42 inches etc. In order to maximize the sink and the drawer stack cabinet sizes I combined them into 1 cabinet – the sink on the left and the draw stack on the right sharing 1 stile between them. The top two drawers of the drawer stack would be the same size and the bottom two would be the same size. This was a fun cabinet to cut, drill, glue and screw because of all the components. In the end it comes out very nice especially with the false front tip out tray in front of the sink and the maximized space for the cabinet and drawers. Continue to follow this series to see the finished product!

Unlike my upper cabinets some of these cabinets would be exposed to water – namely the sink / drawer stack combo unit. So with this cabinet I used Titebond III Glue which is water resistant and holds up around moisture. For the cabinets that were not going to be around the sink I just used Titebond II Glue. Unlike the upper cabinet assembly I switched to using my corded Ryobi Drill instead of using my DeWalt Impact Driver. This worked our much better as I didn’t have to swap out batteries and didn’t have all the noise from the ratcheting.

As always, I try to layout the closely cut lumber so I can get precise measurements. My video below shows laying out a small cabinet as well as how I did the sink / drawer stack combo cabinet.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials

I hope you find this video useful and can use some of the tips presented.

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.


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SBW#26 – Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 3

This is the third part of my kitchen cabinet build, primarily focusing on the work I did building the cabinets from start to finish. In this episode I finish assembling the upper face frames.

I’m squaring up a large frame by racking it a little using a pipe clamp. This causes the frame to move back into square by pulling the long side back even with the short side.

I’m showing how I positioned the blind corner cabinet divider so it would align with the adjacent cabinet while leaving enough frame for the door overlay. This cabinet pair by fair was the most challenging ones I did.

Clamping it so I can mark the positions of where the divider needs to go.

All the upper frames post assembled. They are all pocket hole screwed and glued. I did both forms of joinery so that they were extra strong.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.


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SBW#25 – Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 2

This is the second part of my kitchen cabinet build, primarily focusing on the work I did building the cabinets from start to finish. In this episode I assemble the cabinet, referred to #9, that goes above my microwave/hood combo.

In this video I finish up the pocket hole drilling the first set of frames and begin assembling the first frame. Albeit, probably not the smartest technique here by attempting to assemble it vertical. As you can see, this is not the best way to assemble a frame but it got the job done. I point this out in the video of why in the world was I doing it like this – not once but twice!

Instead lay the frame down on your workbench or assembly table and use the Kreg Clamps to clamp it face down so your pocket holes are showing.

Since I’m using Hard Maple for the frames I’m using Kreg SML-F125 Fine Thread 1 1/4″ screws. Why fine and not coarse, well, simply put fine thread are made for hardwoods and coarse thread are softwood / manufactured woods. Using fine thread screws reduce the change for split out.

As I got into a rhythm of assembling my frames, I improved my techniques which allowed for faster and easier assembly.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#24 – Athletic Shoe Sole Repair

Tired of your shoe sole peeling or completely falling off? Well, in this quick video I show how you can get extra life from those shoes by gluing it back on with some specialized glue.

I am not sure about you but I do not like needing to buy a brand new pair of shoes just because the sole starts peeling off, flapping as I walk or run and eventually completely separating. For one thing a good pair of shoes is too expensive to do this. I like to get maximum wear from my sole before replacing my shoes and this method helps out.

First thing you need to do is thoroughly clean both tread and the sole where it will need to be glued. Then apply some glue and add some pressure. Once dry you can remove the clamping pressure, clean up any squeeze and you should be good to go.

This simple fix can add miles to your shoes and help save that hard earned money.

Tools and Equipment Used

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SBW#23 – Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 1

About a year ago I started the process rebuilding out kitchen cabinets. While that project has been done nearly 8 months now organizing and editing the videos has been an ongoing nightmare to say the least. There are nearly 1TB worth of videos and photos that had to be organized and edited to create this mini-series and unfortunately with today’s ever changing events – its taken me a while. However, I’ve finally been able to produce a few episodes and will begin releasing them with this one below.

After some back and forth with our contractor and their designer we finally had our kitchen plan laid out. I chose to build the cabinets while they did all the rest of the work.

Here are some before and after photos of the kitchen. Note that I have already removed the doors on the old cabinets to keep the hardware and there is 1 missing drawer front as I measured wrong and had to resize it.

Follow this entire series to see how I pulled this massive job off in my small basement shop.

I cannot give you the exact amount of board feet in Maple I used but I can show you how much Maple plywood went into building them. This plywood was used for the cabinet boxes and shelves. In the end I had 2 sheets of 1/4″ and 1 sheet of 3/4″ plywood leftover. Part of this would be to build a bookcase for my son’s room. This can be seen in a different article / video.

The first part of this series involves me primarily explaining what I’m doing as I start the upper cabinet face frame build. I skip ahead in and already have some of my S3S milled down to the proper thickness and ripped to the proper lengths so we can jump right into building the face face frames.

For the face frame joinery I use Kreg Pocket screws along with wood glue. In the past I used to use dowels and glue but this method is much faster as there is half the amount of holes to drill. I have also found that most modern cabinets are made this same way so why not take advantage of current methods. I’ve also experimented with biscuits and glue but found that this method created open slots on smaller dimension lumber.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials Used

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#22 – Nerf Dart Repair

Ever had your Nerf dart tips fall off? If have you a Nerf gun, chances are that answer is yes. They are easier to fix than what you might think and in fact the time needed to fix them is quite fast.

Tips broken off
Tips glued back on with Aleene’s Original Tacky Glue

Before gluing them back together, you will want to pick off as much as the old glue as you can taking care not to damage the foam from the barrel of the dart. Once you have the glue picked off the foam, next turn to get the old glue and foam off the dart tip.

Once the prep has been complete apply a bead of glue around the tip of the dart that inserts into the foam. Then insert the tip back into the foam barrel giving it several twists to spread the glue out evenly.

Next wipe off any glue squeeze out with a paper towel or cloth. Allow the glue to drive for the recommended amount of time before placing the dart back into use. I generally give this about 24 hours.

The video below shows the process in which I went about fixing them. I used Nerf Mega Darts but this also works for other darts such as N-Strike Darts.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below if you would rather buy brand new darts instead of gluing the tips back on.

Parts Used

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.


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Amazon Prioritizes Orders

So with the COVID-19 pandemic, Amazon has temporarily, through April 5th at least, prioritized shipments of the following items. This is to allow these products to get to people that are staying at home to isolate themselves from the outbreak. The Amazon notice can be found here.

Keep in mind that while other orders are said to still be shipping they can be delays.

  1. Baby products
  2. Health and household
  3. Beauty and personal care (including personal care appliances)
  4. Grocery
  5. Industrial and scientific
  6. Pet supplies

You can use my general Amazon Affiliate link here to shop Amazon at no cost to you or the above category links for specific areas. Small portions of the sales will come back to me and help support my site.

May the entire world get through this as safe as possible!

SBW#21 – Table Saw Pulley AND Belt Upgrade

While building my cabinets for my kitchen remodel it became apparent I needed to stop fighting my table saw’s pulleys and belt and upgrade them. What do I mean by this? For years I had dealt with the aluminum pulleys working loose causing a rattle and vibration.

How does something like this happen? Simple – as the v-belt runs around the pulleys it creates heat. Aluminum expands and contracts because of this heat. When it expands the set screw can work itself out a little bit or slide on the shafts. Eventually, you end up with the pulley falling off or rattling which causes the entire saw to vibrate.

How does someone go about solving this problem? Reduce the heat being generated by a link belt maybe? That may reduce the frequency but still generates some heat. How about completely replacing the aluminum pulleys with steel pulleys and a link belt? Bingo! That is what I ended up doing with my table saw which resulted in quite a bit a difference.

First things first I ordered a Grizzly T21992 Power Twist V-Belt and two Gates AK25 Light Duty pulleys – one for the motor and one for the arbor. Next patiently wait for them to arrive except I couldn’t due to the kitchen remodel timelines so I just kept fighting the factory equipment.

Once arriving I pulled the old pulleys off – the one on the motor required some convincing it wanted to be removed – I used penetrating oil for this.

I had to file down the shaft key for the key way because was a little too snug to fit in the slot ground in on the pulleys. Once that was done I slid the pulleys on, tapped the key in and set the link belt size to the appropriate length following the directions provided with it.

Boy was I amazed the difference both in the sound and smoothness of the cutting. I really wish I had made this upgrade prior to almost finishing my cabinets because I could have saved a lot of time tightening down the set screws over and over again while ripping Maple and Plywood. My cuts also would have been much cleaner too without all the vibration.

Below you will find a video on the process I went about doing it. I hope you find it useful and it improves your woodworking level.

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.


Looking for a Gift Idea? Visit the Amazon Gift Hub


Some of the links on this site are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.