Tag Archives: DIY


Looking for a Gift Idea? Visit the Amazon Gift Hub


Looking for athletic clothing? Try Baleaf BaleafReceive 10% off when you use my coupon code: SEANMOENKHOFF


Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 33 – Professional Looking Shelving | SBW#67

Now I’m on the home stretch of getting my kitchen cabinets completed. I’m working on the little accessories that allow for good use and of course, no cabinet would be complete without some shelving right?

Now I could cut some plywood just short of the length and depth of each cabinet interior and put some edge banding on the visible edges or even all four edges. Yes, this is what you get when you buy shelving at the big box stores or that even come with most cabinets but what happens overall? The shelves start to sag and do not look pleasant right?

Okay, so different approach. I’m going to cut some plywood, the same plywood I used to make the cabinets and I’m going to put an edge board on the front. This board will be maple to match the plywood and the same stock I used to build the face frames. It will be 3/4″ thick and about 1″ wide so that it provides support for the shelf. That will keep it from sagging over time and allow for increased weight load.

Alright, let’s get to it. I know that the depth of my cabinets 12″ deep with the face frame. After subtracting the face frame depth and the depth of the back panel I end up with about 11″ so I’ll cut some plywood shelf stock just under 11″ wide. I also cut some maple 1″ wide to provide the front bad board.

Now I’m going to determine if there is a crown (bow) in the maple band board and if so face it so the crown is up. This will for the shelf to bow up slightly but when you put weight on it the shelf will flatten out. This is essentially the same practice builders use when putting in joists in your house.

I have my clamps set up and plywood ready to go. My shelves are cut just oversized at the moment and I do this on purpose so I can get nice clean edges after I’ve glued and pin-nailed the front band board on.

I add glue to the plywood edge, put the band board on, and use my 23 gauge pin nailer to put 3 or 4 pins on the board. You can’t really see them unless you’re up close so I’m good. Once I get these pinned I put them in the camps and tighten them up so I get the same clamping pressure. You don’t need to pin nail them as the glue should be strong enough after it’s dried but the pins for me or more or less to try to hold the bands steady while I’m clamping up multiple shelves at a time so they don’t slide.

After the shelves dry for a bit and remove the clamps and clean up the glue squeezeout with a paint scraper. I’m doing this now because when I use my flush trim router bit in my palm router it will create a smooth edge.

On the underside of the shelf, I use a 5-way painter’s tool to scrape the paint out of the corner. This area won’t be seen so I’m not too worried about it being perfect.

Now I’m going to time the shelves to length using my miter saw. I start by cutting one edge and then measuring 1/4″ shorter than the required length and cutting the other side. This is to allow for the size of the shelf pin brackets. This creates a clean smooth edge between the band board and the plywood shelf and is faster than trying to match up a perfectly cut-to-length shelf with the band board cut.

Now I’m going to take my flush trim router and set the bit just short of the plywood so I don’t cut into it accidentally. I clamp two shelves together so I can do two at once for speed. After making two passes it’s pretty good except where there was a little missed glue. This creates slight ripples in the edge but a good scraper can remove them or even remove the glue and then hit it again with the flush trim bit.

Now it’s time to sand the shelves. I start by sanding the bottom and work my way up to about 150 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander. I take caution not to sand too much as I do not want to sand through the plywood’s maple veneer.

After completing the sanding I tack cloth them and take them out to my garage to spray clean finish on them. I start the finishing like I do any other with the unseen sides/edges first. I’m spraying water-based polyacrylic clear finish on the shelves using my Earlex 5500 HVLP. I finish by spraying the top and front (visible sides) last. I put between 3 to 5 coats of Polycrylic on but over the past 3 years since this was done, I’m thinking I should have done something else for the top as some of our dishes have left water staining and penetration of the finish.

As I spray them I put them on my spray rack to dry in which you can see how smooth the finish is.

Here is a quick look at how I’m ventilating my garage to keep dirt out while keeping the area well ventilated.

I’m using antique bronze shelf pins which are close to the same color as the rest of our kitchen hardware. Take whatever I want to go under the shelf and as a spacer, push in some shelf pins and put the shelf in. Lastly, I let my wife space out the shelves where she wants this since she’s the main kitchen user, and then it’s all done.

As always if you have any questions or comments post them below or on my YouTube video comments section and I’ll do my best to respond.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used. By clicking on any of the links in this article you help support my channel as I earn from qualifying purchases.

You can also help support my Channel by dropping a Tip at https://withkoji.com/@sean.moenkhoff

Equipment and Materials

*Disclaimer: While I attempt to list the equipment I use, some items have been discontinued or have newer models.

I hope you find this video useful and can use some of the tips presented. Feel free to leave any comments, suggestions, or experiences you have had below.

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make a different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 32 – Hidden Storage | SBW#66

Almost every kitchen has a spot for hidden storage. Some kitchens have found this while others have not. While I was building cabinets this hidden spot was often utilized as we pointed out this location to our customers and most elected to use it. In this article, I’m going to expose where this location is and use it. After all, I’m built my own cabinets and so I’m going to use them from the start. However, even if your kitchen is already in use you too can make use of this space.

By now, you’re probably wondering where this location is right? Look no further than right in front of your sink. Chances are your sink does not take up the entire depth of the cabinet it is in. This provides you with the opportunity to add a tip-out tray organizer by adding hinges to the drawer false front in front of it.

So I used the Rev-A-Shelf 30″ Tip Out Tray Organizer. It comes with hinges and all the parts necessary to attach it. and Because I chose to have this go all the way across I ended up using it the 30″ model.

First things first if you’re going to use this type of shelf and you already have your false front attached to your cabinets you’ll need to make sure you have enough room. Assuming you do and you have already purchased a tip-out tray you’ll need to remove the false front from your cabinet. To do so you’ll need to determine if your bracket is one that screws in (in which case you may be able to turn it 90 degrees to pop off the front), or if you’re bracket is a pop-off type in which you can just pop it off.

Before you pop out the false front though I’d advise you to mark with a pencil where the location of the bottom corners of the face frame. This will allow you to position the hinges on it otherwise you’ll need to clamp it up where it needs to go to mark the locations.

Now you remove the false front you’ll need to remove the attachment hardware. Two examples are shown above.

After removing the hardware let’s start by getting the hinge placement on the cabinet face frame.

Make sure you’re paying attention because the hinges will probably be marked for the left and right sides. Mark where you will need to drill pilot holes into the face frame.

Next drill some pilot holes taking into account the size of the screw that needs to go in here.

Now mark and drill the holes on your false front making sure you DO NOT go all the way through. My recommendation would be to use a piece of painter’s tape on your bit to mark how far to go. I just used a pencil line.

Screw the hinges to the false front. Once you get both hinges screwed in I recommend test fitting them to make sure they are all aligned before trying to adjust in when they are in as it is extremely hard if not impossible to do so. I had to take my drawer front off 3 times to get things aligned and install the actual tray.

Before attaching the tray I would determine how and where you want to attach your handles. In my case, I put two so it kept things in alignment with all the other drawers. I did this after I put the 1/4″ filler board in by measuring out the position and drilling from the front inward. I counter-sunk the screw head so it would not cause the tray to bulge.

Next, I would recommend attaching the tray to the drawer. In order to do so, I had to add a 1/4″ filler board behind my drawer panel to bring it out flush with the drawer frame. This can be seen in the image below. I had to wire wheel off some paint and glue the filler board to the raw wood.

Then finally install the entire drawer front, tray, and hinge assembly into the cabinet drawer hole and you should end up with something like the following.

Now you can store sponges, dish scrapers, and alike in this newly found storage location. These are just a few of the things we keep there!

As always if you have any questions or comments post them below or on my YouTube video comments section and I’ll do my best to respond.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used. By clicking on any of the links in this article you help support my channel as I earn from qualifying purchases.

You can also help support my Channel by dropping a Tip at https://withkoji.com/@sean.moenkhoff

Equipment and Materials

*Disclaimer: While I attempt to list the equipment I use, some items have been discontinued or have newer models.

I hope you find this video useful and can use some of the tips presented. Feel free to leave any comments, suggestions, or experiences you have had below.

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make a different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.