Tag Archives: DIY

SBW#22 – Nerf Dart Repair

Ever had your Nerf dart tips fall off? If have you a Nerf gun, chances are that answer is yes. They are easier to fix than what you might think and in fact the time needed to fix them is quite fast.

Tips broken off
Tips glued back on with Aleene’s Original Tacky Glue

Before gluing them back together, you will want to pick off as much as the old glue as you can taking care not to damage the foam from the barrel of the dart. Once you have the glue picked off the foam, next turn to get the old glue and foam off the dart tip.

Once the prep has been complete apply a bead of glue around the tip of the dart that inserts into the foam. Then insert the tip back into the foam barrel giving it several twists to spread the glue out evenly.

Next wipe off any glue squeeze out with a paper towel or cloth. Allow the glue to drive for the recommended amount of time before placing the dart back into use. I generally give this about 24 hours.

The video below shows the process in which I went about fixing them. I used Nerf Mega Darts but this also works for other darts such as N-Strike Darts.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below if you would rather buy brand new darts instead of gluing the tips back on.

Parts Used

The links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links, which means at no extra cost to you, I will make a small commission if you click them and make a qualifying purchase. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#21 – Table Saw Pulley AND Belt Upgrade

While building my cabinets for my kitchen remodel it became apparent I needed to stop fighting my table saw’s pulleys and belt and upgrade them. What do I mean by this? For years I had dealt with the aluminum pulleys working loose causing a rattle and vibration.

How does something like this happen? Simple – as the v-belt runs around the pulleys it creates heat. Aluminum expands and contracts because of this heat. When it expands the set screw can work itself out a little bit or slide on the shafts. Eventually, you end up with the pulley falling off or rattling which causes the entire saw to vibrate.

How does someone go about solving this problem? Reduce the heat being generated by a link belt maybe? That may reduce the frequency but still generates some heat. How about completely replacing the aluminum pulleys with steel pulleys and a link belt? Bingo! That is what I ended up doing with my table saw which resulted in quite a bit a difference.

First things first I ordered a Grizzly T21992 Power Twist V-Belt and two Gates AK25 Light Duty pulleys – one for the motor and one for the arbor. Next patiently wait for them to arrive except I couldn’t due to the kitchen remodel timelines so I just kept fighting the factory equipment.

Once arriving I pulled the old pulleys off – the one on the motor required some convincing it wanted to be removed – I used penetrating oil for this.

I had to file down the shaft key for the key way because was a little too snug to fit in the slot ground in on the pulleys. Once that was done I slid the pulleys on, tapped the key in and set the link belt size to the appropriate length following the directions provided with it.

Boy was I amazed the difference both in the sound and smoothness of the cutting. I really wish I had made this upgrade prior to almost finishing my cabinets because I could have saved a lot of time tightening down the set screws over and over again while ripping Maple and Plywood. My cuts also would have been much cleaner too without all the vibration.

Below you will find a video on the process I went about doing it. I hope you find it useful and it improves your woodworking level.

The links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links, which means at no extra cost to you, I will make a small commission if you click them and make a qualifying purchase. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#20 – Vertical Blind Slat Replacement

For whatever reason you need to replace vertical blind slat. For me the need arose from a wild soccer ball in the house by a child that should know better than to kick it in the house. As a result, that stray ball resulted in cracking a chunk of one of our vertical blind slats out.

Time to replace that broken unsightly slat. The process is really quite simple and anyone can do it really quickly and at a cost significantly less than replacing the whole blind or paying someone to do it.

First things first – you’ll need to procure a new slat or slats depending on how many need replacing. In order to get a slat that matches as close as possible you should check to see if you can get the slat replacement for your particular manufacture. For me, I couldn’t find one so I turned to Amazon to purchase PVC Vertical Blind Replacement Slat (white).

I measured the width and length and took note of the color and the curvature of the slat. Mine are slight curved and not flat. Pretty simple. 3.5″ by at least 67″ in white color. As long as the replacement was at least that I should be good. After all I could always cut to length if it was too long so the width, color and curvature was the most important to me.

I purchased a replacement PVC slat and once it was delivered I measured out the appropriate length, cut it with a pair of scissors and went to work.

After taking down the broken slat I laid it next to the new one so I could get the exact length. I draw a line and cut it with a normal pair of scissors.

Once cutting was complete all I had to do was snap it back in place on the vertical blind stem. To see how vertical blind stems are replaced read my SBW#14 – Graber Vertical Blind Repair article.

This video illustrates how I went about replacing the slat is a quick and easy task to complete.

Parts Used

Amazon Link: PVC Vertical Blind Replacement Slat (white).

SBW#19 – Quick Toilet Flapper Replacement

Every hear that slight little trickle of water running from your toilet tank to the bowl? That sound of the toilet refilling when you did not flush? Well, if you did, you are not alone.

One day I noticed my toilet in my bathroom just started randomly refilling. Since I had this same problem with a toilet in a different bathroom I had a good idea the toilet flapper was worn out.

At first I thought I’d just clean the bottom of the flapper and the rim where the flapper sits to make a seal. Maybe this was solve my problem and for a few days it seemed to slow down the problem but it still persisted. Time to replace the flapper.

Replacing the flapper is really a simple process and you don’t need any special tools (or plumber) to do it. Simple purchase a new one, remove the old one and put the new one back in the tank.

This is not for the faint of heart. You’re going to get your hands wet and you’re going to see the mechanical parts in the toilet tank. After all, what could be worse with dealing with a toilet – the clean side or the used side?!

The particular toilet flapper I use is a Korky Universal Flapper – namely the 2004BP model. It has a 5 year warranty, an adjustable float and is relatively easy to install.

Now the scare part once you have your new flapper. Remove the tank lid off the back of your toilet and reach in, remove the old one and install the new one.

Not so scary after all. Watch the video below to see how quick and easy this process can be.

Amazon Link:
Korky Universal Flapper – 2004BP