Tag Archives: Woodworking


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SBW#27 – Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 4

This is the fourth part of my kitchen cabinet build, primarily focusing on the work I did building the base cabinets from start to finish. In this episode I finish assembling the base cabinet face frames. If you want to see how I made the upper cabinets you can read about there here.

Since my shop is rather small and by that I mean like 1/4 of my basement I cannot store nor mill all the lumber I need in a single batch. Therefore I purchased additional Maple and let it acclimate to my basement for 2 to 4 week prior to milling it. I do this process though the entire cabinet build series with one exception – the sheet goods or plywood. Due to the amount needed I purchases and had the entire load delivered. This however was stored in the finished area of my basement.

All the plywood necessary for my project

So after milling and ripping to width additional face frame material I begin basically the same process I did for the upper face frames. However, this time around the styles were only 30 inches long and there would be drawers.

Unlike the upper cabinets I did not need additional width for the bottom rail to conceal the under cabinet lighting so all frame material is 1 1/2 inches in width. This made it much easier for cutting the raw stock in that I didn’t need to make sure I could get the additional 1/4 inch width on the bottom rails.

Again I used the same joinery method for the frames – pocket holes using my Kreg Jig. My model is a K4 and most of my clamps are the older style that do not automatically adjust for thickness but the do the job. It’s important to keep a clean work area when drilling all these pocket holes because you can really end up with a large pile of drill shavings. This is why I use some hose adapters to fit the system onto a 2 1/2 inch dust collector line. You could also use these same fittings to go to a shop vac.

I mentioned earlier that my stiles were 30 inches long. How did I come up with this measurement? Well, typical base cabinet height is 36 inches including the counter top. Knowing my counter top would be 1 1/2 inches (pretty standard) that would give me 34 1/2 inches from the top of the cabinet (excluding the counter top) to the floor. Since I wanted a 4 1/2 inch toe kick at the bottom I ended up with 30 inches (total height – counter top thickness – toe kick = style height or 36″ – 1.5″ – 4.5″ = 30″).

When adding my drawer rail I used a 5 inch space block. This allowed me to keep consistent sizes for all my drawers. This took out any error that might come from using a rule or tape measure to space this rail. All I had to do is stick the spacer block in there and screw the rail in place.

Unlike store bought cabinets my sink cabinet was going to be a custom job also. What do I mean by that? Well, most cabinets come in sizes with multiples of 3 inches – 30, 33, 36, 39, 42 inches etc. In order to maximize the sink and the drawer stack cabinet sizes I combined them into 1 cabinet – the sink on the left and the draw stack on the right sharing 1 stile between them. The top two drawers of the drawer stack would be the same size and the bottom two would be the same size. This was a fun cabinet to cut, drill, glue and screw because of all the components. In the end it comes out very nice especially with the false front tip out tray in front of the sink and the maximized space for the cabinet and drawers. Continue to follow this series to see the finished product!

Unlike my upper cabinets some of these cabinets would be exposed to water – namely the sink / drawer stack combo unit. So with this cabinet I used Titebond III Glue which is water resistant and holds up around moisture. For the cabinets that were not going to be around the sink I just used Titebond II Glue. Unlike the upper cabinet assembly I switched to using my corded Ryobi Drill instead of using my DeWalt Impact Driver. This worked our much better as I didn’t have to swap out batteries and didn’t have all the noise from the ratcheting.

As always, I try to layout the closely cut lumber so I can get precise measurements. My video below shows laying out a small cabinet as well as how I did the sink / drawer stack combo cabinet.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials

i hope you find this video useful and can use some of the tips presented.

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#26 – Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 3

This is the third part of my kitchen cabinet build, primarily focusing on the work I did building the cabinets from start to finish. In this episode I finish assembling the upper face frames.

I’m squaring up a large frame by racking it a little using a pipe clamp. This causes the frame to move back into square by pulling the long side back even with the short side.

I’m showing how I positioned the blind corner cabinet divider so it would align with the adjacent cabinet while leaving enough frame for the door overlay. This cabinet pair by fair was the most challenging ones I did.

Clamping it so I can mark the positions of where the divider needs to go.

All the upper frames post assembled. They are all pocket hole screwed and glued. I did both forms of joinery so that they were extra strong.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#25 – Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 2

This is the second part of my kitchen cabinet build, primarily focusing on the work I did building the cabinets from start to finish. In this episode I assemble the cabinet, referred to #9, that goes above my microwave/hood combo.

In this video I finish up the pocket hole drilling the first set of frames and begin assembling the first frame. Albeit, probably not the smartest technique here by attempting to assemble it vertical. As you can see, this is not the best way to assemble a frame but it got the job done. I point this out in the video of why in the world was I doing it like this – not once but twice!

Instead lay the frame down on your workbench or assembly table and use the Kreg Clamps to clamp it face down so your pocket holes are showing.

Since I’m using Hard Maple for the frames I’m using Kreg SML-F125 Fine Thread 1 1/4″ screws. Why fine and not coarse, well, simply put fine thread are made for hardwoods and coarse thread are softwood / manufactured woods. Using fine thread screws reduce the change for split out.

As I got into a rhythm of assembling my frames, I improved my techniques which allowed for faster and easier assembly.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#23 – Kitchen Cabinet Build Part 1

About a year ago I started the process rebuilding out kitchen cabinets. While that project has been done nearly 8 months now organizing and editing the videos has been an ongoing nightmare to say the least. There are nearly 1TB worth of videos and photos that had to be organized and edited to create this mini-series and unfortunately with today’s ever changing events – its taken me a while. However, I’ve finally been able to produce a few episodes and will begin releasing them with this one below.

After some back and forth with our contractor and their designer we finally had our kitchen plan laid out. I chose to build the cabinets while they did all the rest of the work.

Here are some before and after photos of the kitchen. Note that I have already removed the doors on the old cabinets to keep the hardware and there is 1 missing drawer front as I measured wrong and had to resize it.

Follow this entire series to see how I pulled this massive job off in my small basement shop.

I cannot give you the exact amount of board feet in Maple I used but I can show you how much Maple plywood went into building them. This plywood was used for the cabinet boxes and shelves. In the end I had 2 sheets of 1/4″ and 1 sheet of 3/4″ plywood leftover. Part of this would be to build a bookcase for my son’s room. This can be seen in a different article / video.

The first part of this series involves me primarily explaining what I’m doing as I start the upper cabinet face frame build. I skip ahead in and already have some of my S3S milled down to the proper thickness and ripped to the proper lengths so we can jump right into building the face face frames.

For the face frame joinery I use Kreg Pocket screws along with wood glue. In the past I used to use dowels and glue but this method is much faster as there is half the amount of holes to drill. I have also found that most modern cabinets are made this same way so why not take advantage of current methods. I’ve also experimented with biscuits and glue but found that this method created open slots on smaller dimension lumber.

I’ve included a few Amazon Links below for the equipment and materials I used.

Equipment and Materials Used

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#21 – Table Saw Pulley AND Belt Upgrade

While building my cabinets for my kitchen remodel it became apparent I needed to stop fighting my table saw’s pulleys and belt and upgrade them. What do I mean by this? For years I had dealt with the aluminum pulleys working loose causing a rattle and vibration.

How does something like this happen? Simple – as the v-belt runs around the pulleys it creates heat. Aluminum expands and contracts because of this heat. When it expands the set screw can work itself out a little bit or slide on the shafts. Eventually, you end up with the pulley falling off or rattling which causes the entire saw to vibrate.

How does someone go about solving this problem? Reduce the heat being generated by a link belt maybe? That may reduce the frequency but still generates some heat. How about completely replacing the aluminum pulleys with steel pulleys and a link belt? Bingo! That is what I ended up doing with my table saw which resulted in quite a bit a difference.

First things first I ordered a Grizzly T21992 Power Twist V-Belt and two Gates AK25 Light Duty pulleys – one for the motor and one for the arbor. Next patiently wait for them to arrive except I couldn’t due to the kitchen remodel timelines so I just kept fighting the factory equipment.

Once arriving I pulled the old pulleys off – the one on the motor required some convincing it wanted to be removed – I used penetrating oil for this.

I had to file down the shaft key for the key way because was a little too snug to fit in the slot ground in on the pulleys. Once that was done I slid the pulleys on, tapped the key in and set the link belt size to the appropriate length following the directions provided with it.

Boy was I amazed the difference both in the sound and smoothness of the cutting. I really wish I had made this upgrade prior to almost finishing my cabinets because I could have saved a lot of time tightening down the set screws over and over again while ripping Maple and Plywood. My cuts also would have been much cleaner too without all the vibration.

Below you will find a video on the process I went about doing it. I hope you find it useful and it improves your woodworking level.

Some of the links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#18 – Straight Edge Sled

How often do you go to use a piece of wood you purchased from a home center or even a hardware dealer and neither edge is straight? You certainly don’t want to try to cut a curve on your table saw and trying to guestimate a straight cut can be difficult and dangerous at best case.

So, with this handy inexpensive jig for your table saw you can create a nice clean straight edge on that piece of lumber that you once deemed not very good to use.

What you will need for this project is some toggle clamps and a piece of manufactured sheet good. I used simple 500lb vertical toggle clamps that I picked up from a home center and piece of MDF I had laying around. The length of the MDF in this case determines the maximum length of the piece of would you can cleanly cut. While the vertical toggle clamp links are not exactly the ones I used, I have provide amazon links to ones equivalent.

I simply mounted the vertical toggle clamps to a riser board and the MDF so I could clamp down material that I typically use.

The video below shows the process in which I used to create this and straighten a piece of material that was severely crowned.

Amazon Link
Vertical Toggle Clamp

SBW#16 – How to Make a Table Saw Auxiliary Rip Fence

Have you ever needed an longer, perhaps a sacrificial rip fence on your table saw? Then you should read ahead.

This is exactly what I needed to perform some tasks that required a longer rip fence than my table saw provided. While the current fence I have is pretty versatile for a stock contractor rip fence it lacks both in length past the table top and the ability to really clap good sacrificial or tall fence additions on.

So, this where I decided to create a quick basic fence that allows me to easily clamp on additional height past my working area – since my working area not only is for the saw on the table saw but also for the router that is mounted on a table saw extension.

I made mine out of some scrap 3/4 MDF and some scrap Popular boards I had laying around after a previous project. The fence is 4 foot long and a few inches taller than my table saw’s stock fence.

In this video I show the process I went about making the rip fence in which I later use in my massive kitchen cabinet building project. I hope you find this video helpful.

Amazon Links:
Bessey 3″ Spring Clamp
Bessey Spring Clamp Set

Kitchen Complete

So we finally finished our kitchen renovation and move in. It has been a long process but it is with great joy that today, the final drawer front went on. This drawer front needed to be remade due to a calculation error with the bottom two drawers on the drawer stack – which they were supposed to be the same size but I neglected to account for overlay differences. Needless to say, they are done, items are back in their new homes and I’m ready to move on to the next project which is going to be a message center with a work space for a laptop.

Here are a few pictures for before the renovation… I had already removed the old cabinet doors so I could salvage the hardware.

Here are a few pictures of the after the renovation…

It is going to take me a while to process about 764 image and video files totaling nearly 400G in raw content. I plan on processing this down to smaller videos and subsequently a few other projects that spawned from these because of the need for jigs, how I did certain components, etc. I should start having videos as time permits but it is certainly going to take me some time to get of the project process. I’ll release videos as I create them not hold them until all the editing is complete.

Project Update

So it’s been almost a month since I’ve posted anything. There’s a great reason for that. I’ve been spending crazy amounts of time getting a new kitchen cabinet set complete prior to my kitchen renovation. After all, why buy inferior cabinets or over priced high quality ones when you can make them yourself right?

That said so far I’ve ended up with nearly 200 raw videos of making this entire set, which to meet the deadlines I have, leaves very little time for editing all those videos into my Kitchen Cabinet Series.

Once I get everything complete I should have more time to edit the videos and get some video content posted.

In the meantime however here are some progress pictures.

First there was one cabinet, then two, then three … you get the picture.

Pause in Updates

First let me say it has been a while since I have made an update. This is partly in fact because I have several on-going projects that I am working on along with busy spring / summer activities. Several are complete but I have not had time to edit the raw videos into a nice presentation and the others are ongoing still.

So – what is done but not edited yet?

I painted the walls and refinished the floors in our spare bedroom. This is where we planned on moving our daughter into from her smaller child room. Here is just one of the pictures of the floor. After she was moved into this room I got a chance to do the same (paint and refinish) to her old room.

My son’s dresser drawer bottoms were falling out on 2 of his drawers so I need to fix them. Who hasn’t purchased clothes furniture that has 1/8″ thick drawer bottoms and not had issues like this?

I built a longer sacrificial fence for my table saw. This will be used for a project that I’m currently working on – Complete Kitchen Cabinet Replacement. You can even notice some of the rough Maple lumber to the upper left for that project.

So what is in progress?

Here are 5 of the 14 face frames I need to make for our new kitchen cabinets. The frames will be maple painted white with Maple veneered plywood for the cabinet boxes with a clear finish – at least that’s the plan.