Tag Archives: Woodworking

SBW#21 – Table Saw Pulley AND Belt Upgrade

While building my cabinets for my kitchen remodel it became apparent I needed to stop fighting my table saw’s pulleys and belt and upgrade them. What do I mean by this? For years I had dealt with the aluminum pulleys working loose causing a rattle and vibration.

How does something like this happen? Simple – as the v-belt runs around the pulleys it creates heat. Aluminum expands and contracts because of this heat. When it expands the set screw can work itself out a little bit or slide on the shafts. Eventually, you end up with the pulley falling off or rattling which causes the entire saw to vibrate.

How does someone go about solving this problem? Reduce the heat being generated by a link belt maybe? That may reduce the frequency but still generates some heat. How about completely replacing the aluminum pulleys with steel pulleys and a link belt? Bingo! That is what I ended up doing with my table saw which resulted in quite a bit a difference.

First things first I ordered a Grizzly T21992 Power Twist V-Belt and two Gates AK25 Light Duty pulleys – one for the motor and one for the arbor. Next patiently wait for them to arrive except I couldn’t due to the kitchen remodel timelines so I just kept fighting the factory equipment.

Once arriving I pulled the old pulleys off – the one on the motor required some convincing it wanted to be removed – I used penetrating oil for this.

I had to file down the shaft key for the key way because was a little too snug to fit in the slot ground in on the pulleys. Once that was done I slid the pulleys on, tapped the key in and set the link belt size to the appropriate length following the directions provided with it.

Boy was I amazed the difference both in the sound and smoothness of the cutting. I really wish I had made this upgrade prior to almost finishing my cabinets because I could have saved a lot of time tightening down the set screws over and over again while ripping Maple and Plywood. My cuts also would have been much cleaner too without all the vibration.

Below you will find a video on the process I went about doing it. I hope you find it useful and it improves your woodworking level.

The links in my video description and article above are Amazon Affiliate links, which means at no extra cost to you, I will make a small commission if you click them and make a qualifying purchase. If you would like to make different purchase from Amazon, you can also use the storewide link.

SBW#18 – Straight Edge Sled

How often do you go to use a piece of wood you purchased from a home center or even a hardware dealer and neither edge is straight? You certainly don’t want to try to cut a curve on your table saw and trying to guestimate a straight cut can be difficult and dangerous at best case.

So, with this handy inexpensive jig for your table saw you can create a nice clean straight edge on that piece of lumber that you once deemed not very good to use.

What you will need for this project is some toggle clamps and a piece of manufactured sheet good. I used simple 500lb vertical toggle clamps that I picked up from a home center and piece of MDF I had laying around. The length of the MDF in this case determines the maximum length of the piece of would you can cleanly cut. While the vertical toggle clamp links are not exactly the ones I used, I have provide amazon links to ones equivalent.

I simply mounted the vertical toggle clamps to a riser board and the MDF so I could clamp down material that I typically use.

The video below shows the process in which I used to create this and straighten a piece of material that was severely crowned.

Amazon Link
Vertical Toggle Clamp

SBW#16 – How to Make a Table Saw Auxiliary Rip Fence

Have you ever needed an longer, perhaps a sacrificial rip fence on your table saw? Then you should read ahead.

This is exactly what I needed to perform some tasks that required a longer rip fence than my table saw provided. While the current fence I have is pretty versatile for a stock contractor rip fence it lacks both in length past the table top and the ability to really clap good sacrificial or tall fence additions on.

So, this where I decided to create a quick basic fence that allows me to easily clamp on additional height past my working area – since my working area not only is for the saw on the table saw but also for the router that is mounted on a table saw extension.

I made mine out of some scrap 3/4 MDF and some scrap Popular boards I had laying around after a previous project. The fence is 4 foot long and a few inches taller than my table saw’s stock fence.

In this video I show the process I went about making the rip fence in which I later use in my massive kitchen cabinet building project. I hope you find this video helpful.

Amazon Links:
Bessey 3″ Spring Clamp
Bessey Spring Clamp Set

Kitchen Complete

So we finally finished our kitchen renovation and move in. It has been a long process but it is with great joy that today, the final drawer front went on. This drawer front needed to be remade due to a calculation error with the bottom two drawers on the drawer stack – which they were supposed to be the same size but I neglected to account for overlay differences. Needless to say, they are done, items are back in their new homes and I’m ready to move on to the next project which is going to be a message center with a work space for a laptop.

Here are a few pictures for before the renovation… I had already removed the old cabinet doors so I could salvage the hardware.

Here are a few pictures of the after the renovation…

It is going to take me a while to process about 764 image and video files totaling nearly 400G in raw content. I plan on processing this down to smaller videos and subsequently a few other projects that spawned from these because of the need for jigs, how I did certain components, etc. I should start having videos as time permits but it is certainly going to take me some time to get of the project process. I’ll release videos as I create them not hold them until all the editing is complete.

Project Update

So it’s been almost a month since I’ve posted anything. There’s a great reason for that. I’ve been spending crazy amounts of time getting a new kitchen cabinet set complete prior to my kitchen renovation. After all, why buy inferior cabinets or over priced high quality ones when you can make them yourself right?

That said so far I’ve ended up with nearly 200 raw videos of making this entire set, which to meet the deadlines I have, leaves very little time for editing all those videos into my Kitchen Cabinet Series.

Once I get everything complete I should have more time to edit the videos and get some video content posted.

In the meantime however here are some progress pictures.

First there was one cabinet, then two, then three … you get the picture.

Pause in Updates

First let me say it has been a while since I have made an update. This is partly in fact because I have several on-going projects that I am working on along with busy spring / summer activities. Several are complete but I have not had time to edit the raw videos into a nice presentation and the others are ongoing still.

So – what is done but not edited yet?

I painted the walls and refinished the floors in our spare bedroom. This is where we planned on moving our daughter into from her smaller child room. Here is just one of the pictures of the floor. After she was moved into this room I got a chance to do the same (paint and refinish) to her old room.

My son’s dresser drawer bottoms were falling out on 2 of his drawers so I need to fix them. Who hasn’t purchased clothes furniture that has 1/8″ thick drawer bottoms and not had issues like this?

I built a longer sacrificial fence for my table saw. This will be used for a project that I’m currently working on – Complete Kitchen Cabinet Replacement. You can even notice some of the rough Maple lumber to the upper left for that project.

So what is in progress?

Here are 5 of the 14 face frames I need to make for our new kitchen cabinets. The frames will be maple painted white with Maple veneered plywood for the cabinet boxes with a clear finish – at least that’s the plan.

SBW#7 – Central Machinery Belt Sander Assembly and Review

Some time ago I purchased a Central Machinery 4″ x 36″ Belt and 6″ Disk Sander. For the longest time I had just clamped by 3″ wide portable belt sander upside down and used it like a stationary one but I found that as I used it with more projects I need a wider/longer table to do quality work.

As a result, I foray in this realm is with a bench top model from Harbor Freight. While I know most of the time their tools will not pass the longevity test, it made a good starter.

I unboxed it and started to assembly this unit and could already tell that would be the case.

One of the things I took notice of was the dust collection system on this device was not very robust. In fact, I am not sure how it even manages to work with a 1/2″ dust port on the disk sander dust guard definitely limits the cfm that you need to move dust. The port under the belt was better but certainly not what I was expecting. Perhaps this was designed to be hooked up to a small shopvac? I am not sure but my 4″ system could easily swallow the dust guards themselves.

The other thing that bothered me was the bed for the belt had a twist in it. It is one thing for the bed to be not square but with a twist in it, well, that will not necessarily make straight edges. I do believe though I can twist it back in shape but still I should not have to do that for a new piece of equipment.

Using the sander though was much nicer than my old setup. Even with the same grit sandpaper it seemed to easily take on the jobs I threw at it. Perhaps that is because the motor was just better than a portable one and therefore did not bog down as much. Plus, it comes with the added bonus of having lower decibels than my old portable Skill Belt Sander.

Overall, assembly was smooth minus some force needed to get the rubber feet on, overall stability is not great but good considering the price point. Longevity has yet to be determined. The two major downsides that I have found was the twist in the bed and dust collection – who needs one for a high dust creating device right?

Below is the video of the assembly. If you enjoy it, please give a thumbs up and do not forget to subscribe.

 

Amazon Link:
Central Machinery 4″ x 36″ Belt 6″ Disc Sander Belt/Disc